Posted by: Renee | January 8, 2008

Sights and scenes..

Flic en Flac - beach on sundays

weekends  beaches are fun all around the island.. crowded and with lots of merchands selling snacks and fresh juices..  

grand baie .. public beach

try the pineapple and coconut (l’eau de coco) its very tasty and refreshing..

mahebourg citylife

everyday life in Mahébourg.. just have a coffee, tea or juice somewhere and take time to watch ppl go by.. Mauritians always seem to be busy and heading for something.. but in a very relaxed way…

glas recyling

imported glasbottles come here for recycling and the glasware that is made out of it is worth a look.. most hotels have glasses designed by this manufacturers..

shrine at the sugarcane fields

everywhere close to the sugarcane fields there are shrines. The offerings will bring good harvest.. as the workers believe..

sugar cane harvest

The French established the sugar industry under Governor Mahe de Labourdonnais. Then, slaves were brought from Madagascar and Africa to work in these sugarcane fields.
Read more about the history of sugar with reference to the 19th century in mauritius
here..

mahebourg cyper cafe

In 2005 mauritians still believed that by year’s end, or soon afterward, maurice will become the world’s first nation with coast-to-coast wireless Internet coverage, the first country to become one big “hot spot.” ..now we are in 2008 and still only very few can afford to have their own access because of high prices.. so cyper cafes are crowded.. read more about mauritian hot spots here..

manioc bisquits mahebourg

Around 1807, Jean Fabien Rault sailed from his native village of St. Brieuc, Brittany, France to settle in “Isle de France,” (Mauritius.) In 1809 he got married and in 1868, Hilarion, his youngest son who was also married by then, tried the making of manioc biscuits for fun. They tasted so good that he was encouraged by his family and friends to start marketing them. The factory was set up and the first commercially manufactured biscuits were sold as from 1870. Read more..

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